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I simply love to be busy and create things, especially my own custom-made garments. Nothing is more fun than answering the question, "Where did you get that?"

Sunday, July 29, 2012

McCalls 6359

<b>Pattern Description: </b>This is an EASY pattern for three different top variations from McCalls. 
<b>Pattern Sizing:</b>
This is a multi-sized pattern with A5 having sizes 6 to 14 in one envelope. I choose a 12 for view C. 
<b>Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?</b>  ....well, if you subtract the modifications I made, yes, the original shape of the garment is there. 
<b>Were the instructions easy to follow?</b>
Instructions were super easy, almost too easy, if you know what I mean.  I had to make some modifications as nothing screams made by me like a turned under and stitched neckband and armhole edges--maybe that is just me. 

<b>What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?</b>
I really liked the style of A and actually constructed that top first, but it was so very loose fitting and bare (yes, I know it is supposed to be bare in the back, but it felt uncomfortably so) that I just couldn't wear it and feel great about it, so I cut it apart and decided on view C instead.  I didn't have white stretch lace, so I went with the same fabric as the bodice front and back.  More on design changes below. 
View C fit much more to my liking. 

<b>Fabric Used:</b>
I used a cheap cotton knit from Hancock.  I love the color and who doesn't love polka-dots? I wouldn't recommend the fabric because it wasn't the best quality. 


<b>Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:</b>
Here goes on changes!  I had fully intended to create a 'plain' garment, i.e., no embellishments but the screen prints I ordered from Marcy Tilton arrived while I was at Hancocks so I just had to play with them!  I started with the purple paint and the large screen and placed six of those down the front in a cascading pattern. 
After that screen, I wanted to soften it up a bit with the stencil I purchased for one dollar at Hancock.  I used two colors for that one: yellow and green.  The dots on the stencil I used the same purple color I used for the large screen. 
Well, this is when trouble began.  I started counting the number of large swirls I so carefully screened and realized there were SIX, not five, not seven.  Everyone knows an odd number is more pleasing, so I grabbed the wet foam brush I used for the purple and added another swirl.  All was great in the universe until I lifted the screen and realized the brush wasn't just a little wet, it was really wet an the paint ran in a big way.  I was just about to wad it up when DH arrived and checked out my issue and suggested I piece in a coordinating piece of fabric and cut the mistake out.  Now, why didn't I think of that?  I used his suggestion and I liked it!  So, I carried on. 
Armhole and neckline edges are finished on the pattern envelope using bias tape.  I hate using bias tape on knits so I cut strips on the bias and added those but left about 1/2 inch so you can see it on the right side.  On the neckline I decided to use the white and polka-dots layering the two strips on top of one another.  I like the result until I noticed it wasn't perfectly even so I just trimmed the white close to neckline and it is just barely peeking out.  I had the very cute lime green buttons and decided I just HAD to use them, so they ended up at the neckline as well. 
I also used 5/8 inch strips of interfacing in the hemline as this knit is pretty thin and stretches out easily.  It helped keep the hemline in check when I top stitched it.
Oh, and the most important modification I made was to the yoke back: I redrew the shape of the yoke so I had more coverage in back.  If you look at the envelope, the gal wearing view C has roughly 1/2 of her back showing, I extended the narrowest portion of the yoke by about 1.5 inches on each side. 
I also did my normal sway back alteration, on for this top, instead of 1/2 inch, I used 1.5 inches.   

<b>Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?</b>
I may sew this again.  If one of my two DDs wants one I will sew it up for them.  I may create it again for myself.   
<b>Conclusion: </b>
I had a lot of fun with this top and it will be just in time for me to wear to watch my son graduate from boot camp in Texas.  I am sure this top will keep me cool--at least I hope so!
Thanks for reading,
Sue



Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Katherine Tilton Vogue 8817

Not one for repeats, I decided I had to repeat this Katerine Tilton top. I have created it once before with this same view, but feel like I have a completely different look!  Wow, I think I need to repeat patterns more often! 

For this go around, I decided on view B. You can see the version I adapted here: Katherine Tilton top

Here is the description from the back of the envelope I copies and pasted from Vogue's website:
Close-fitting, pullover top has neck binding, seam detail, stitched hems, contrast variations, and optional double needle topstitching and silk screen motifs. A and B: sleeve bands. B:lower front cut on crosswise grain of fabric. D: purchased trim. Note: included are Katherine Tilton's instructions for silk screening.
FABRICS: For Two-Way Stretch Knits: Cotton/Spandex, Rayon/Spandex, Nylon/Spandex. Contrast A,B,Contrast C,D 1,2: Sheer Knits.

When I started putting this top together, I realized that for some silly reason, I didn't purchase enough fabric.  ARGH!  It isn't like I could just go get more as I purchased this fabric when I was in Minneapolis, which is four hours away!  Sometimes when you are faced with a sewing problem, it forces you to be more creative than you may have been.  I am pleased with my end result.   


Fabric used: Graphic knit from Treadle Yard Goods in Minneapolis.  The coordinating solid was also purchased at Treadle.   

Directions: the directions for this pattern are really excellent. There are tips from Katherine on screen-screening your top! The pattern is well-drafted and everything fits together very well.

What did I change? My changes were based on the fact I simply didn't purchase enough fabric.  So, I decided to freelance a design on just one sleeve of the top.  I couldn't find any sort of screen print, stencil, or found objects to recreate the design with paint so I freelanced.  I used some thin pressing bars and portions of two foam stamps.  The rest I free handed.  Paint was purchased at Dharma and I highly recommend it if you like to embellish your garments--either out of necessity, or simply to add whimsy and a fun twist!  



  

What did I like/dislike?
I really like the styling of this pattern.  I believe it looks great on a variety of people and with variety of fabrics. This can be dressed up/down as much as you'd like!  Any of these tops just scream for embellishments, creativity, and a variety of textures and fabrics.  I can't imagine using just one fabric on this top!   

I highly recommend this pattern if you want something a little different to wear. I like all the views, and this is the second time I have made view A.  Now, if the weather would just cool down so I can wear it! 

Have fun with this pattern! I sure did! 
Thanks for reading,
Sue

Thursday, July 19, 2012

McCall's 6035

What a fun top!  This is a McCall's pattern for four versions of a princess seamed blouse.  I simply love this pattern!  I believe this will become a TNT for me! 

Here is my version and review. 

Pattern Description:
Here is the description from the back of the pattern envelope: Shirts A, B, C, D have princess seams and button closures, shirt A has collar band and short sleeves with cuffs; shirts B, C, D have collar, collar band and below elbow length sleeves; shirt B has sleeves with cuffs shirt C has sleeves with turn back cuffs with tabs; shirt D has sleeves with drawstrings, separate pattern pieces provided for A/B, C, D cup sizes.  pattern image

Suggested fabrics: lightweight fabrics such as cotton, cotton blends, challis, crepe de chine, charmeuse, silk rayon, handkerchief linen. 




Pattern Sizing:  This is a multi-sized pattern.  I used a 14 for this top. 

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes, I believe that is looks just like the drawing. 

Were the instructions easy to follow?
This is a well written, well configured pattern.  Everything fit together well, notches matched up.  If you are a beginner and haven't sewn a blouse, this might be the pattern for you! 

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I really love these 'cup' sized patterns.  They eliminate the need to complete an FBA.  I have had wonderful success with every pattern that has cup sizes included. 

Fabric Used:
I used 100% linen from SR Harris in Minneapolis.  I love the turquoise and orange combination.  I was able to use orange buttons for this blouse.  How often do you get to do that?  I love orange! 

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
I made a 1/2 inch swayback alteration and am glad I did.  Design changes include a great deal more topstitching than is included int he pattern.  The pattern instruction have you top stitch the front band.  I included topstitching on the princess seams, around the collar band, the sleeve bands, and a double row on the hem.  I used a beautiful rayon Sulky thread that matched so well I simply had to use it a lot on the blouse. 

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I have a few pieces in my stash that I am eying for versions B & D.  They are different enough from A that I can use this pattern at least three times, if not many more! 
Yes, I do recommend this pattern to others.  It is fast, easy, ripe for embellishments, and fun to put together.  If you are speedy, this could become an instant gratification project--it is that easy! 

Conclusion:
This is a great pattern.  I wish I wouldn't have waited so long to sew it up!
Thanks for reading!
Sue

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Vogue 1247 top

I was so excited when I saw this pattern and just think it is adorable on!  I just love all the versions of this well-drafted, stylish top! 
Here is my version but first things first, the pattern photo: Pattern photograph

This is one of Vogue's American Designer series from Rachel Comey.  It is so much fun to put together designer patterns!  This one is rated Average, mostly because of the french seams on the top is what I figured. 

Here is the description from the Vogue website:
MISSES' TOP AND SKIRT: Very loose-fitting top. Semi-fitted A-lined skirt has front in-seam pockets.
NOTIONS: Skirt: One 7"/9" Invisible Zipper, One Waistband Hook and Eye Closure.
FABRICS: Top: Crepe de Chine, Charmeuse, Lightweight Linen.
Skirt: Taffeta, Lightweight Gabardine, Lightweight Denim, Linen.
Lining: Lining Fabrics.

Fabric used: I used a soft 100% cotton that I cut out and then silk screened using one of Marcy Tilton's screens called Bouquet and some glittery, silver fabric paint. 

Did it look like the pattern picture: yes, I believe it does.  The pattern lines make this top distinct. 

Design/pattern modifications: get ready for it--I only changed one thing and that was eliminating about half of the french seams.  Can you believe it?  I pretty much left the design alone!  Oh wait, I did silk screen the fabric after I cut out the pieces.  I wanted just enough, but not too much of the pattern of the screen with the gray/silver paint. 

So, leaving the construction alone and sallying forth, I put this top together in just a few hours!  Yes, it is loose fitting and perhaps my fabric isn't as flowy as the model on the envelope, but I do believe that with several more washings (and no ironings) this cotton will feel like butter! 

I highly recommend this top.  I am going to try it again in a silkier fabric.  I will definitely create the skirt--only in a longer length. 

Thanks for reading!


Sue

Monday, July 16, 2012

Version 2 Vogue 8817

Not one for repeats, I decided I had to repeat this Katerine Tilton top.  This is part of a creation I started when I was at Katherine's workshop titled, Beyond the Arty T held in Minneapolis the weekend after the 4th of July.  What fun!  DD1 stated I needed to give more information on the screen printing process, so here goes! 

For this go around, I decided on view C.  You can see the version I adapted here: Katherine Tilton top

Here is the description from the back of the envelope I copies and pasted from Vogue's website:
Close-fitting, pullover top has neck binding, seam detail, stitched hems, contrast variations, and optional double needle topstitching and silk screen motifs. A and B: sleeve bands. B:lower front cut on crosswise grain of fabric. D: purchased trim. Note: included are Katherine Tilton's instructions for silk screening.
FABRICS: For Two-Way Stretch Knits: Cotton/Spandex, Rayon/Spandex, Nylon/Spandex. Contrast A,B,Contrast C,D 1,2: Sheer Knits.

When I started putting this top together, I didn't have any stretch lace, nor could I find any where I live, so I couldn't incorporate that into my design.  Should I decide to create this for a third time, which I might, I will have to use lace somewhere!  It is so pretty with it! 

Fabric used: Cotton/bamboo blend.  Super soft, super light weight, beautiful color! 

Directions: the directions for this pattern are really excellent.  There are tips from Katherine on screen-screening your top!  The pattern is well-drafted and everything fits together very well. 

What did I change?  My changes were based on a few bone-head moves I made that caused me to have to make a few changes.  My changes have nothing to do with the pattern!  Just wanted to make that clear! 



Ok, so here was my plan.  I cut out the lovely blue bamboo/cotton blend I had enough of to fit the pattern.  After cutting out the pieces, I decided to use three different screen prints on the front lower bodice only.  I layered the colors starting with the copper color.  I love the combination of the copper and blue, it looks great!  Next, put on the emerald green and used that color rather sparingly.  I lastly used the redish-purple.  When you use screens for the first few times it is easy to get carried away and use way too much paint.  Start slow, you can add more, but overkill is simply overkill!  Next I decided I needed another color of fabric to complement the screen print so I found the coppery colored knit at Treadle Yard Goods in Minneapolis.  Relief!  As I began playing with the top, I decided to put just a hint of color in the form of piping along the front bodice piece.  After I got that piece stitched on, I thought it was too much so I merely trimmed the piping close to the seam line on the right side, yes, you read that correctly and I typed it correctly....the right side of the top.  I toned it down a lot! Next, I put the remainder of the top together but realized I couldn't find the back lower top and was running periously close to not being able to finish this top when I realized that I could piece the back together and top stitch the seam so it looked to be on purpose rather than an accident.  Whew, disaster averted!
Lastly, it has been so blasted hot and I sewed one sleeve incorrectly, so I hacked off the lower sleeve portion and decided to go with short sleeves.  Instead of hemming this with a traditional hem, I used some of the coppery fabric and cut 2 inch strips, folded them in half and serged in place.  I pressed the seams towards the top and edge stitched twice. 

What did I like/dislike? 
I really like the styling.  I believe it looks great on a variety of people and a variety of fabrics.  This can be dressed up/down as much as you'd like! 
No dislikes, other than I should have used a more substantial fabric--my fault! 

I highly recommend this pattern if you want something a little different to wear.  I like view C, but I think I will get more use out of the two shorter tops on the pattern.  This top fits well and offers itself to a great deal of creativity no matter how adventerous you are!

Have fun with this pattern!  I sure did!  suggestions for what to wear this with will be much appreciated!
Thanks for reading,
Sue  


Amy Butler Cabo Halter

This is such a cute and easy to construct top made of any type of woven fabric you can imagine!  This was Amy Butler's first apparel piece and wow is it a great one! 

Here is the description: simple and breezy, casual or dressy.  A simple halter with refined lines to enhance the romance of warm weather!  What isn't included is my description of the pattern: simple tie neckline, unlined halter top with back invisible zipper and fitted bodice. 

Size: I made a medium and feel the top runs true to size. 
All you need to sew this top is a bright and cheery fabric that is light to medium weight, an invisible 12 " zipper, and thread.  No interfacing is required! 

What I love about Amy's instructions are that a very beginner could pick up this pattern and experience success.  Illustrations are very complete along with the written directions. 

I like this pattern.  It was a little low for me neckline wise so I fixed that by inserting a coordinating fabric piece in the neckline to raise it to a more modest level.  That was the only thing I changed about the pattern! 

I used a 100% yummy cotton I purchased from either Fabric Mart or Fabric.com a while back.  I have had the pattern for quite some time and debated whether I was 'too old' to get away with wearing this.  I decided that since my arms aren't too embarrisingly low-toned I could indeed wear it in public.  Besides, it has been unusually HOT here (along with most of the US, I know) and why can't I also be comfortable? 

So, here is my top.  I wore it to a picnic and was told I look great!  Now, how is that for boosting your confidence?  Sorry, but I simply can't figure out how to rotate the pictures.  I have them saved in a rotated manner, but when I copy them onto this website, they rotate back.  Argh! 

Thanks for reading!

Sue
I LOVE this top!  Here is a photo of the pattern envelope: Katherine Tilton top
This is such a versitale pattern.  I was at a sewing workshop hosted by Katherine Tilton over the weekend and saw about 5 different versions of view C/D of this pattern and each was so very unique and gorgeous! 
Here is my rendition.  This top is my wearable muslin.  I used an ITY knit from Fabric Mart.  I love the print, but it was so thin it was honestly difficult to work with as it rolled so much!  Keep that in mind as you read through my couple of struggles! 

This top is close-fitting, pullover tops A, B, C, D have neck binding, seam detail, stitched hems, contrast variations, optional double needle topstitiching and silk screen motifs.  A, B, sleeve bands.  B: lower front cut on crosswise grain of fabric.  D: purchased trim.  Katherine's instructionsf ro silk screening are included in the pattern. 

I used view B.  I already have view C cut out and ready to go! 

As I said before, I used a rather thin knit.  I love purchasing fabric on-line, but with knits it is tough as you can feel how thick they are! 
Ok, so here goes!  This is a great design.  I love the styling and honestly, you can make this top very fitted at the top of the bodice and then loose and flowing in the waist and skirt area for views C and D. 

For my rendition, here is what I changed:
I shortened the sleeves simply by leaving off the contrast bands.  I also used seam tape at the shoulders, back yoke and neckline.  I originally hemed the sleeves and lower edge of the top and hated how it looked so I ripped it all out and get ready for it--decided to leave the edges raw!  Only a few minutes passed before I decided this was a horrible idea as the fabric was sort of splitting at the raw edge.  So, I found some of the black stretch fabric that a new sewing friend offered and I sewed a strip to the hemlines on the sleeves and lower edge.  I think it gives the top a rather edgy-look. 

So, I have another top cut out and ready to go that I have screen printed and found the perfect contrast fabric at a shop in Minneapolis called Treadle Yard Goods.  They have a wonderful selection of knits that are not only lovely but feel to be quite good quality wise. 

Conclusion: This is such a cute and flattering top on a variety of body types.  You can make it as funky as you'd like with screen prints, embrodery, fabrics, etc. 

Thanks for reading! 


Sue

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Vogue 8817 Katherine Tilton top

I LOVE this top!  Here is a photo of the pattern envelope: Katherine Tilton top
This is such a versatile pattern.  I was at a sewing workshop hosted by Katherine Tilton over the weekend and saw about 5 different versions of view C/D of this pattern and each was so very unique and gorgeous! 
Here is my rendition.  This top is my wearable muslin.  I used an ITY knit from Fabric Mart.  I love the print, but it was so thin it was honestly difficult to work with as it rolled so much!  Keep that in mind as you read through my couple of struggles! 

This top is close-fitting, pullover tops A, B, C, D have neck binding, seam detail, stitched hems, contrast variations, optional double needle topstitiching and silk screen motifs.  A, B, sleeve bands.  B: lower front cut on crosswise grain of fabric.  D: purchased trim.  Katherine's instructions for silk screening are included in the pattern. 

I used view B.  I already have view C cut out and ready to go! 

As I said before, I used a rather thin knit.  I love purchasing fabric on-line, but with knits it is tough as you can feel how thick they are! 
Ok, so here goes!  This is a great design.  I love the styling and honestly, you can make this top very fitted at the top of the bodice and then loose and flowing in the waist and skirt area for views C and D. 

For my rendition, here is what I changed:
I shortened the sleeves simply by leaving off the contrast bands.  I also used seam tape at the shoulders, back yoke and neckline.  I originally hemmed the sleeves and lower edge of the top and hated how it looked so I ripped it all out and get ready for it--decided to leave the edges raw!  Only a few minutes passed before I decided this was a horrible idea as the fabric was sort of splitting at the raw edge.  So, I found some of the black stretch fabric that a new sewing friend offered and I sewed a strip to the hemlines on the sleeves and lower edge.  I think it gives the top a rather edgy-look. 

So, I have another top cut out and ready to go that I have screen printed and found the perfect contrast fabric at a shop in Minneapolis called Treadle Yard Goods.  They have a wonderful selection of knits that are not only lovely but feel to be quite good quality wise. 

Conclusion: This is such a cute and flattering top on a variety of body types.  You can make it as funky as you'd like with screen prints, embroidery, fabrics, etc. 

Thanks for reading! 


Sue

Monday, July 9, 2012

Vogue 8636 Marcy Tilton Top



This top is one of Marcy Tilton's patterns from 2010. Here is the link to the pattern photograph Vogue 8636.  Here is the description from the back of the envelope: Fitted, pullover tops A, B, C, D with darted neckbands.  A: contrast sleeve and neck band, lower edge of sleeve is raw-finished.  B, C: three-quarter length sleeves.  C: pleats over front neck darts, decorative buttons.  D: darts on outside of neckband and lower edge of sleeve.

I modified view B.  More on modifications below. 

I used a wonderfully soft bamboo-cotton knit I purchased from either Fabric.com or Fabric Mart.  I simply have so much fabric in my stash, I can't remember!  It is very light weight, exactly what I wanted for this top.  I love the shocking pink color!  The print on the fabric was created by ME!  I screened printed those three motifs on the fabric AFTER I had the pattern cut out.  It was great fun! 

This top is super easy to put together and has so many design possibilities!  You can use a variety of fabrics, patterns, weights and will become a TNT for me! 

What I liked/disliked: Love the styling.  The raglan sleeves are fantastic and this top fits well--if you want something more fitted than a regular knit top.  It is also very modest, something I love!  This takes relatively little fabric and you can play with embellishments!  What more could you ask for? 
No dislikes whatsoever!

What I changed:  Screen printing, of course!  I also lowered the neckline 2 inches in front.  I was at a sewing workshop hosted by Katherine Tilton over the weekend and she, along with a few others, suggested that I lower the neckline a little.  So, I did!  I also decided to narrow the neckline to about 5/8 inch instead of the about 2 inch one in the pattern. 

Would I recommend this?  Absolutely!  I plan on making it again with sheer sleeves for fall.  For winter, I would love to use some funky buttons on the neckline. 

Conclusion: great top!  Try this pattern! 

Thanks for reading!
Sue

Thursday, July 5, 2012

Vogue 1224 Tracy Reese Design



Believe it or not, this tunic started as Vogue 1224, Tracy Reese's very popular short dress. Obviously I made some changes, which I will explain below.
The pattern description is listed as this: Partially lined, pullover dress has short dolman sleeves, elasticized waistline and neckline with tie ends, stitched hems and above mid-knee length. Purchased stoppers for tie ends. This dress is listed as Very Easy for Vogue. It is sized for Two-way stretch knits only.
Yes, my face is red because it is HOT here! It was 100 degrees and I think our air is on the fritz. It has literally run non-stop all day and it is only getting warmer in here. It could be a long, hot night.
It is the 4th of July and my dog is terrified of all the fireworks. You can see he wanted back inside in the worst way!

I love this pattern. I loved my fabric--at first, then I realized it was too much for the original plan I had which was to make a maxi-dress. This fabric is an ITY jersey I purchased from Fabric Mart. I was heavenly to work with and feels great against your skin.
I do think that my tunic resembles the photograph.

This is a multi-sized pattern. My measurements are between a 14 and 16 and knowing the bodice is loose-fitting and the skirt is very snug, I cut the 16, knowing I would need to take in the bodice. What I didn't expect is that the bodice was fine and the skirt was huge! I double checked my fabric layout and pattern pieces, so I am not sure why I had to take 2 inches off each side of the skirt. I didn't want it as snug as the models, after all, she doesn't have any cellulite and I try to keep mine underwraps. A short, tight skirt won't do me any favors!

Here are the alterations I made:
1. Sleeves, the sleeves made the dress look like pajamas on me, so I started at the shoulder seam and cut a whopping five inches from that point and tapered to nothing at the side seams.
2. Length: I started with a maxi length, and felt like I was wearing a night gown. I didn't want to scrap the entire project, so between texts to my two DD, we came up with tunic, leggings, and belt.

I really like the style of the pattern. The casings for the elastic neckline and waistline are narrow, about 1/8 inch wider than the non-roll elastic (which you must use for this to look right) so be prepared for bigger triceps, biceps, and forearms!
Other reviewers mentioned the dress didn't need the waistline casing. It doesn't but I put one in anyway and I like the result. I think a designer dress is worth a few more steps.

I would recommed this pattern to others. It seems like there are a lot of options from fabric, length, etc.

Conclusion: test the skirt fit before you attach the skirt to the bodice so you get the fit you want. Lining the skirt is a great idea as everything lies nicely when you are finished.

Sunday, July 1, 2012

Simplicityy 2455

This is a Simplicity pattern for a Misses' wardrobe of a simple dress or top, pants and jacket.  There is an optional belt for the dress.  This pattern is one of the Thread's Magazine collections.   Here is a link to the pattern numbered 2455.  Pattern Image 
I originally made this dress last summer and the fabric shown is one I was using for a muslin.  I purchased it for 75% off!  I ended up really liking it.  Unfortunately, I only wore the dress once because I didn't like how the upper bodice fit me.  So, along came beautiful DD2 and she tried it on.  It fit her okay, but we wanted it to fit her much better. 

Pattern Sizing:  This is a multi-sized pattern.  I believe it ran true to size except through the bust area.  It was a little snug in that spot. 

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes, it does, except I didn't use the belt.  I didn't think the fabric worked well as a belt. 

Were the instructions easy to follow?
Instructions were very easy to follow.  Except for the bust area, this pattern is well drafted and well written.  Instructions were great. 

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I wanted a simple sheath dress that had modest coverage for work and this pattern met that criteria.  I just wish it would have fit me better.  I am glad I was able to salvage the dress for DD2.  My favorite part of the entire dress is how the invisible zipper is inserted into the side seam, about 3 inches from the base of the armhole.  The zipper pull doesn't dig into your arm pit.  The placement is great! 

Fabric Used:
I used a cotton/poly Jacquard.  It was a debate with myself as to which side of the fabric I was going to use.  I ended up with the off-white, light grey side rather than the turquoise side. 

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
To adjust this dress to fit my petite daughter, I took the neckline off and raised the back of the dress by adjusting the shoulder seams to accomodate the lower seamline (I hope this makes sense).  I adjusted the back by an inch. 
Next, the fit was a little roomy in the waist line and hips and so we inserted vertical darts in the front and back.  That little trick worked really well. 
I raised the hemline by about 3 inches as she is not as tall as I am. 
I didn't use the bias tape for the armhole seams but used bias cut fabric.  My fabric was rather ravely and the bias tape just didn't have the containment power, if you know what I mean. 

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I may try this pattern again.  I think the jacket has some possibilities.  I usually don't really repeat patterns since my collection of them seems to multiply like rabbits! 

Conclusion:
This is a simple, well-designed dress that has many possibilities.  If you want an easy sewing fix, whip this up!